Tag Archives: LSAT logic games

LSAT Advanced Prep Weekend Toronto – November 7, 8/15

The LSAT Advanced Prep Weekend

Who: John Richardson

Where: University of Toronto – St. Michael’s College – Room TBA

When: November 7, 8 – 9:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Price: $495 + HST = $559.35

Registration: See below

Why: Lately I have been receiving a number of calls where people say something like …

I have already taken the LSAT. I have taken this LSAT course or that course. I have used this LSAT tutor or that LSAT tutor, I have used this LSAT book or that book. I am overwhelmed by all the steps and procedures. I need to take the LSAT again, etc, etc, etc.

It’s clear that these people do NOT need a “beginners” LSAT course. What they do need is to learn:

“How to get a larger number of right answers by applying a fewer number of skills.”

Furthermore, the reasons that people have trouble with the LSAT are more related to their reading than to their reasoning. The single most important skill tested on the LSAT is to accurately read and understand the INFORMATION you are expected to then REASON with.

That said, the focus of this weekend will be overwhelmingly on LSAT Logic Games and LSAT Logical Reasoning

But, I would like you to start right now. Here is a post that describes your objective in LSAT preparation and what you must achieve. Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication in both LSAT and in life.

During the weekend, you will learn how to:

– why the LSAT is more of reading test than a reasoning test. In fact, the LSAT really should be called the “READ Test

– identify a smaller number of LSAT skills/techniques that are ALWAYS relevant

– Simplicity is virtue. How to make the complex simple

– learn how to better understand what the LSAT question is telling you and HOW to work with that information (it is not possible to work with all the information that the LSAT throws your way)

– the Logic Games Toolbox (doing more with less)

– adjust the order in which you do the questions

– understand the differences between “diagramming” and “positioning” and how to get started answering questions more quickly

– conditional statements, parallel reasoning and how to better use “conditional statements” (a former president of Law Services call “conditional reasoning” the “basic LSAT reasoning task”) – but watch our for the most common of LSAT mistakes in conditional reasoning

(See my interview with Professor Deborah Bennet: Author of: “Logic Made Easy”)

– how to get your “best guess on record more quickly” (sometimes  you are better off getting a question wrong quickly than getting it right slowly). “Different strokes for different folks.” How your personality type will affect the way that you answer LSAT questions.

– while we are on the topic of personality, there is some evidence that LSAT Prep affects your brain

– why you should NOT categorize LSAT Logical Reasoning questions and what you should ask about all Logical Reasoning questions

– identifying and avoiding the most common LSAT Logical Reasoning flaws

– how to strip LSAT arguments down to their bare essentials (so, what’s an LSAT argument anyway?)

– and more (plus you will actually have a lot of fun) …

My goal is to help you do more with a fewer number of skills that ALWAYS matter.

Pre-Course Prep:

I once wrote a post on “Pre-LSAT Prep” …

But, before the weekend …

1. I urge all attendees to purchase and read “The New Official LSAT SuperPrep” from LSAT. There is a new edition available, but if you can’t get the new edition, the Old “Official LSAT SuperPrep” is fine.

2. I want you to read my list of “Best LSAT Blog Posts“. I have worked hard on them over the years.

Registration – Three ways:

1. Phone VISA or Mastercard: 416 410 7737

2. Eventbrite

3. Use this form:

Toronto Mastering The LSAT Preparation Courses

John Richardson – Mastering The LSAT  – Toronto, Canada – 416 410 7737

Put 30 Years of LSAT Teaching Experience and Law School Admissions Consulting To Work For You!

The only complete LSAT and Law School Application Course!

New Law School Preview Program – Everything you need to know about law school and how to succeed!

Who: John Richardson – Author: Law School Bound and Mastering The LSAT (of the bar of Ontario)

Where: University of Toronto – St. Michael’s College

When: Multiple start dates – Courses starting on any of:  November 16, 23, 30

Continue reading

Toronto LSAT Logic Games Advanced Workshop – Sept. 29/13


LSAT October 5, 2013

What: LSAT Logic Games, LSAT Logical Reasoning and Law School Personal Statement Workshop

When: Sunday September 29, 2013 – 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Where: University of Toronto – St. Michael’s College – Carr Hall – 100 St. Joseph St. – Room 405

Who: John Richardson

Fee: $195 + HST

Pre-registration IS required. Use this form. Your registration will be confirmed by email.

Personal “Early Bird” LSAT Prep Start

McMaster Pre-Law Society - Wine and Cheese


“Hello John,

Your one piece of advice was more meaningful than any part of the ______  course. I am so thankful that I had the opportunity to talk to you that day.

If you are at all available to meet for one day in Toronto to discuss an overview of general approaches to the LSAT, I think it would be extremely helpful. Please let me know if you are able to meet in January and at what cost it would be.”


“Hi John,
I just wanted to send you a quick email to say thank-you for a wonderful session this Sunday.  I really found it helpful to have some one on one time with you.  It was so insightful to work with you and learn from your experience.  I would be interested in another individualized session that could address my needs.
I have been working through the materials on my own, but have not seen the same results that I had with you.  I know that there is a session in March, but I would be interested in seeing you before then”

Personal “Early Bird Start”:

For  people  taking the June 12, 2012 LSAT we are offering you the  opportunity of a “Personal Early Bird Start”. What does this mean?

You are invited to take a three  hour private session featuring:

– Pre-Law Counseling

– Areas of Pre-LSAT Prep that may be appropriate for you

– Early Bird LSAT Logic Games and Logical Reasoning start

– anything else  that you want to talk  about

This may be done in a live meeting in downtown Toronto or  over the telephone. It  is  scheduled at a time that works for  you.

The cost  is an additional $250 over the cost of the Mastering The LSAT program. In other words the cost  of the Mastering The LSAT program with the “Personal Early Bird”  start is $999 + $250 = $1249.

The personal “Early Bird Start  is available without the taking the Mastering The LSAT course for $499.

To schedule your Private “Early Bird” Start call  416 410 7737.

Note: This is also available as a small group session – a group of friends, etc.

Pre-LSAT Prep – Getting The Most From Your PREP Experience


Your LSAT Test Score

What does your LSAT score  measure? Your LSAT test score is a measure of how well you answer LSAT questions (on that particular test day). What does  a high LSAT score mean? A high LSAT test score means  that the person reads well. It is probable that a low LSAT scorer does not read well (although there are a number of other factors that might contribute to a low score). This makes sense because the LSAT is a test of how well you apply your reading and reasoning skills to LSAT questions. In a previous post, I suggested that the LSAT should be called the “R.E.A.D.” test (Reading Effectively and Deducing).

The Two Kinds of LSAT Preparation

“Formal LSAT preparation” = the process of specifically learning to improve the application of your reading and reasoning skills to actual LSAT tests, for the purpose of achieving your maximum  LSAT score

“Informal LSAT preparation” = the process of improving your general level of reading and reasoning skills so that you are starting your “Formal LSAT preparation” from a higher general level of reading and reasoning Continue reading

Should you retake the LSAT?

Definition: the words “LSAT Happiness” mean that an LSAT test taker has:

“achieved a score that is high enough that he or she will not be rejected from law school.”

The February LSAT scores are out. There are four groups of score recipients: Continue reading

The LSAT, Law School Admission, and Role The LSAT Plays in Law School Admission

The LSAT, Law School Admission, and Role The LSAT Plays in Law School Admission

John Richardson, Toronto Canada

The LSAT  is required by almost every law school in the United States and Canada. (It is interesting that the law schools in Michigan, Illinois and Alabama have not required the LSAT in certain circumstances. It is unclear how this is consistent with the ABA

Let’s begin with some sentiment  from the mainstream media:

“Yet it’s well-known among law school applicants that many Canadian schools sort their applications into piles by LSAT score and simply axe off those below a certain percentile. How many brilliant future lawyers are lost below that line, who, for one reason or another, simply can’t handle the LSAT?

It seems to me that there’s some room here for a Canadian law school to set itself apart by announcing a new, more holistic approach to admissions by waiving the LSAT requirement and perhaps doing something like having admissions interviews, which no Canadian law school does, instead, on top of using references and personal statements and extra-curriculars and undergraduate performance. If not for a whole
entering class, then perhaps schools could set aside a certain portion of first-year seats for applicants that do not require the LSAT, like the University of Michigan law school did in 2008. Continue reading

LSAT Releases Ten New Actual LSAT Tests With Comparative Reading

When you prepare for the LSAT it is essential to use actual LSAT questions. The individual test books are available for purchase from LSAT. The most economical way to purchase the tests is in books of 10. At the present time LSAT has released:

– 10 Actual LSATs  (Tests 9 – 18)

– 10 More Actual LSATs (Tests 19 – 28)

– The Next 10  Actual LSATs (Tests 29 – 38)

In September 2009, I blogged that LSAT would be releasing a new book of 10 LSATs.

The wait is over – just in time for you to prepare for the June 6, 2011 LSAT. I just receive an email from Amazon announcing that on March 1, 2011, LSAT will  be releasing:

Ten New Actual Official LSAT PrepTests with Comparative Readings

This book will be essential for your LSAT Preparation. We are including it with all of our Toronto LSAT Preparation Courses. It includes LSAT PrepTests 52 – 61 which are the LSAT tests from September 2007 to October 2010. The June 2007 LSAT is available as a free free LSAT download from Law Services.

LSAT Logic Games Webinar – Discoverlaw.org

Posted on April 28, 2010 by admin

I highly recommend that you visit  “discoverlaw.org”. It is either run by or in conjunction with the Law School Admission Council (the people who brought you the LSAT).

On Thursday April 28, 2010, Discoverlaw.org conducted  an  “LSAT Prep Webinar” about how to prepare for the Analytical Reasoning (Logic Games) portion of the LSAT.

It was conducted by Lori Davis, who is a senior test specialist at LSAT. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time that LSAT has run a seminar dedicated to LSAT preparation. As a long time, LSAT prep class teacher, I was interested to hear what LSAT says about its own test.  I was treated to one hour of  “LSAT on the LSAT”. It was interesting. I made notes and decided to put those notes on my LSAT blog and social media sites. What follows is a summary of the Webinar (both the information given and the my impressions of it) for the benefit of those who were unable to attend. Discoverlaw.org will be running more LSAT prep Webinars. Continue reading