Tag Archives: Free LSAT

Toronto Mastering The LSAT Preparation Courses

John Richardson – Mastering The LSAT  – Toronto, Canada – 416 410 7737

Put 30 Years of LSAT Teaching Experience and Law School Admissions Consulting To Work For You!

The only complete LSAT and Law School Application Course!

New Law School Preview Program – Everything you need to know about law school and how to succeed!


Who: John Richardson – Author: Law School Bound and Mastering The LSAT (of the bar of Ontario)

Where: University of Toronto – St. Michael’s College

When: Multiple start dates – Courses starting on any of:  November 16, 23, 30

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Free #LSAT Preview Toronto – March 8 – 9:00 a.m. – Books included!

 

Who: John Richardson – Mastering The LSAT

When: Saturday March 8/14 – 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m.

Where: University of Toronto – St. Michael’s College – Carr Hall – 100 St. Joseph St. – Room 103

Pre-registration is not necessary. Feel free to just appear.

Free books included: Logic Games Workbook and one free actual LSAT

Get started for the June 9, 2014 LSAT

Your LSAT teacher will “make or break” your LSAT course experience. Attend a sample LSAT class. Begin your LSAT preparation in an effective and intelligent way. Leave with some introductory LSAT material.

 

Law schools offer free LSAT prep

It’s funny. Years ago, I remember the law schools taking the position that LSAT prep courses were a waste of time. Looks like the LSAT prep industry has proved the law schools wrong. Some law schools are beginning to run their own LSAT courses.

Good news!  The law schools are now endorsing the value of LSAT prep. It will be interesting to see what effect this has. Will the law school endorsement of LSAT prep courses mean that almost all law school applicants will be taking LSAT courses? Time will tell.

In the interim …

This may be the beginning of a trend.

 

 

Opportunities To Study Law – The Trend Is Your Friend

Opportunities To Study Law


Most people go to law school because they want to become a lawyer. Pre-law students spend much of their time asking the answerable question of: what are the chances of getting into law school? Furthermore, they worry incessantly about Canadian law school rankings. Yet, many pre-law students in Canada are unaware of the range of opportunities available to them. The purpose of this post is to (at the very least) make you aware of the range of opportunities available to  you. It is NOT to give specific advice about programs. Remember that the “trend is always your friend”. Think about my predictions. A global legal practice is becoming the rule rather than the exception. Continue reading

John Richardson Interviewed – “Law School Bound”

Posted on April 1, 2010 by admin

In late March of 2010 I was interviewed about my “Law School Bound” book by Steve  Schwartz (the publisher of  “LSAT Blog“). What follows are the questions and answers.


 

1. You published Law School Bound back in 2006. What new advice do you have for law school applicants today?

Law School Bound was designed to guide people from the decision to attend law school, through the application process, through the bar admission process and into a legal career. The book was designed to “stand the test of time”. Therefore, I wouldn’t give any different advice in 2010. Continue reading

Thoughts on LSAT Preparation – Let’s call it the “READ” test

Renaming The LSAT – Let’s call it the “READ” Test


Principle: The best acronyms should be descriptive acronyms!

What does the acronym “LSAT” stand for?

LSAT is an acronym that stands for “Law School Admission Test”.

The LSAT is:

- a four letter word;
- a barrier between you and the law school of your choice (or perhaps any law  school)
- a standardized test (every test taker gets the same questions);
- a multiple choice test (rewarding answer identification first and understanding second);
- a long test;
- a test administered under strict time constraints;
-  an important test Continue reading

Should you retake the LSAT?

Definition: the words “LSAT Happiness” mean that an LSAT test taker has:

“achieved a score that is high enough that he or she will not be rejected from law school.”

The February LSAT scores are out. There are four groups of score recipients: Continue reading

The GRE as a possible substitute for the LSAT

4. If either the ABA or the law schools continue to require a “valid and reliable  admission test” what test or tests should  be required? Should  the LSAT be the only game in town?

The general requirement of a “valid and reliable admission test” is not a specific requirement  to  use  the LSAT.  (It is true that the ABA rules require a law school to demonstrate that another test is valid and reliable.) I predict  that there will be  competitors to the LSAT– and it is high time. Continue reading

The LSAT, Law School Admission, and Role The LSAT Plays in Law School Admission

The LSAT, Law School Admission, and Role The LSAT Plays in Law School Admission

- John Richardson, Toronto Canada

The LSAT  is required by almost every law school in the United States and Canada. (It is interesting that the law schools in Michigan, Illinois and Alabama have not required the LSAT in certain circumstances. It is unclear how this is consistent with the ABA
rules.)

Let’s begin with some sentiment  from the mainstream media:

“Yet it’s well-known among law school applicants that many Canadian schools sort their applications into piles by LSAT score and simply axe off those below a certain percentile. How many brilliant future lawyers are lost below that line, who, for one reason or another, simply can’t handle the LSAT?

It seems to me that there’s some room here for a Canadian law school to set itself apart by announcing a new, more holistic approach to admissions by waiving the LSAT requirement and perhaps doing something like having admissions interviews, which no Canadian law school does, instead, on top of using references and personal statements and extra-curriculars and undergraduate performance. If not for a whole
entering class, then perhaps schools could set aside a certain portion of first-year seats for applicants that do not require the LSAT, like the University of Michigan law school did in 2008. Continue reading

LSAT Releases Ten New Actual LSAT Tests With Comparative Reading

When you prepare for the LSAT it is essential to use actual LSAT questions. The individual test books are available for purchase from LSAT. The most economical way to purchase the tests is in books of 10. At the present time LSAT has released:

- 10 Actual LSATs  (Tests 9 – 18)

- 10 More Actual LSATs (Tests 19 – 28)

- The Next 10  Actual LSATs (Tests 29 – 38)

In September 2009, I blogged that LSAT would be releasing a new book of 10 LSATs.

The wait is over – just in time for you to prepare for the June 6, 2011 LSAT. I just receive an email from Amazon announcing that on March 1, 2011, LSAT will  be releasing:

Ten New Actual Official LSAT PrepTests with Comparative Readings

This book will be essential for your LSAT Preparation. We are including it with all of our Toronto LSAT Preparation Courses. It includes LSAT PrepTests 52 – 61 which are the LSAT tests from September 2007 to October 2010. The June 2007 LSAT is available as a free free LSAT download from Law Services.