Category Archives: LSAT Logic Games

Toronto Mastering The LSAT Preparation Courses

John Richardson – Mastering The LSAT  – Toronto, Canada – 416 410 7737

Put 30 Years of LSAT Teaching Experience and Law School Admissions Consulting To Work For You!

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Who: John Richardson – Author: Law School Bound and Mastering The LSAT (of the bar of Ontario)

Where: University of Toronto – St. Michael’s College

When: Multiple start dates – Courses starting on any of:  November 16, 23, 30

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MacLeans 2013 Canadian civil and common #Lawschool rankings

The above tweet references the annual 2013 MacLeans Canadian law school rankings.

It is an interesting read, but should not be relied on.

 

 

 

 

Toronto LSAT Logic Games Advanced Workshop – Sept. 29/13

 

LSAT October 5, 2013

What: LSAT Logic Games, LSAT Logical Reasoning and Law School Personal Statement Workshop

When: Sunday September 29, 2013 – 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Where: University of Toronto – St. Michael’s College – Carr Hall – 100 St. Joseph St. – Room 405

Who: John Richardson

Fee: $195 + HST

Pre-registration IS required. Use this form. Your registration will be confirmed by email.

Live #LSAT prep vs. online #LSATprep classes

I came across the article referenced in the above tweet. It’s an interesting read and includes:

But, I just can’t shake the feeling that my students would have been much better served in a more traditional face-to-face setting. So, sadly, I know that it is now time for me to put down my grading mouse and walk away from the keyboard.

To be fair, I’m confident that all students did learn something in the classes I have taught, but that doesn’t mean I should call the courses a success.

Let’s walk through many of the reasons for why I feel that education, including MOOCs (massive open online courses) and online distance learning, is travelling down a dangerously slippery slope.

The internet has made quality education available to anybody, anywhere, at any time. World class universities are making their courses available online. You may not get a degree for taking the course, but the knowledge is available. I would argue that the online world may be the best place to provide information. After all, the information can be read, read again and absorbed at your own pace. Too tired? That’s fine. Come back to it when you are feeling better. Don’t like the teacher? Fine, find another one.

More and more people are taking online LSAT courses. Some are opting to take online courses instead of live courses. This is a trend that is certain to continue.

LSAT prep is NOT the about providing information. It’s  about developing “reading and reasoning” skills that must be applied in a “high pressure” environment. Those who achieve the highest LSAT scores are those who are best able to apply the basic “reading and reasoning” skills consistently, effectively and quickly. In other words, LSAT prep is more like preparing for an athletic event. Is an online class or a live class the better environment to achieve this?

I would be very interested in your thoughts.

Part of the LSAT Toolbox – Bad backward reasoning

If you have take a formal logic course, you will recognize this as the logical fallacy of “affirming the consequent“. The LSAT test designers recognize it as a tool to attract you to the wrong answer.

Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words. Here is a nice picture that explains why bad backward reasoning is bad. Hat tip to “LSAT Freedom”.

 

Bad backward reasoning is one of many components taught in university logic courses. It is an aspect of the proper understanding of “conditional statements”. Listen to my interview  of Professor D. Bennet about her book “Logic Made Easy“.

 

 

 

Listen to internet radio with lawschoolbound on BlogTalkRadio

 

Logic Made Easy – Deborah J. Bennett Interviewed

logicmadeeasy

The LSAT is a test of reading and reasoning. Many LSAT test takers have difficulty with “LSAT language” and some of the basic logical rules of inference. Deborah J. Bennett is a math professor at New Jersey City University. She is also the author of the book “Logic Made Easy“. “Logic Made Easy” is a very practical and readable book on the principles of logic. I have recommended it to many pre–laws as part of their LSAT prep. During the interview Professor Bennett references questions from  the October 1996 LSAT exam.

The interview also includes a discussion of LSAT quantifiers and the importance of LSAT simplification. As always the LSAT READ Principle shines through by inference. “Logic Made Easy” is a book that can be used through both the  “Pre-LSAT Prep” and LSAT prep process.

The interview is at BlogTalkRadio.

Listen to internet radio with lawschoolbound on Blog Talk Radio

8 Skills you need to succeed in LSAT Logic Games

Reproduced from LSATLogicGames.com – The Prep Course

Skill 1 – How To Accurately Understand The Conditions

If  you don’t understand the conditions, you will be unable  to make accurate inferences from them. Every Logic Games condition or rule is a “built in” reading test.

LSAT designers are  very skilled in obscuring important information. As a general principle you must  understand:

– positioning issues (where do  things go)
– numbering issues (how many objects are you working with? Are there  too few, too many,  or is it one-to-one correspondence?
– How does the order of the conditions influence  the way that you must understand them?
– Quantifiers: all,  some, many, exactly,  only, etc.

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LSAT Logic Games Webinar – Discoverlaw.org

I highly recommend that you visit  “discoverlaw.org”. It is either run by or in conjunction with the Law School Admission Council (the people who brought you the LSAT).

On Thursday April 28, 2010, Discoverlaw.org conducted  an  “LSAT Prep Webinar” about how to prepare for the Analytical Reasoning (Logic Games) portion of the LSAT.

It was conducted by Lori Davis, who is a senior test specialist at LSAT. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time that LSAT has run a seminar dedicated to LSAT preparation. As a long time, LSAT prep class teacher, I was interested to hear what LSAT says about its own test.  I was treated to one hour of  “LSAT on the LSAT”. It was interesting. I made notes and decided to put those notes on my LSAT blog and social media sites. What follows is a summary of the Webinar (both the information given and the my impressions of it) for the benefit of those who were unable to attend. Discoverlaw.org will be running more LSAT prep Webinars.

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LSAT preparation alters your brain, study suggests

 

 

 

Personal “Early Bird” LSAT Prep Start

McMaster Pre-Law Society - Wine and Cheese

 

“Hello John,

Your one piece of advice was more meaningful than any part of the ______  course. I am so thankful that I had the opportunity to talk to you that day.

If you are at all available to meet for one day in Toronto to discuss an overview of general approaches to the LSAT, I think it would be extremely helpful. Please let me know if you are able to meet in January and at what cost it would be.”

______________________________________________________________________

“Hi John,
I just wanted to send you a quick email to say thank-you for a wonderful session this Sunday.  I really found it helpful to have some one on one time with you.  It was so insightful to work with you and learn from your experience.  I would be interested in another individualized session that could address my needs.
I have been working through the materials on my own, but have not seen the same results that I had with you.  I know that there is a session in March, but I would be interested in seeing you before then”
_________________________________________________________________________

Personal “Early Bird Start”:

For  people  taking the June 12, 2012 LSAT we are offering you the  opportunity of a “Personal Early Bird Start”. What does this mean?

You are invited to take a three  hour private session featuring:

– Pre-Law Counseling

– Areas of Pre-LSAT Prep that may be appropriate for you

– Early Bird LSAT Logic Games and Logical Reasoning start

– anything else  that you want to talk  about

This may be done in a live meeting in downtown Toronto or  over the telephone. It  is  scheduled at a time that works for  you.

The cost  is an additional $250 over the cost of the Mastering The LSAT program. In other words the cost  of the Mastering The LSAT program with the “Personal Early Bird”  start is $999 + $250 = $1249.

The personal “Early Bird Start  is available without the taking the Mastering The LSAT course for $499.

To schedule your Private “Early Bird” Start call  416 410 7737.

Note: This is also available as a small group session – a group of friends, etc.