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LSAT Advanced Prep Weekend Toronto – May 13, 14/17

The LSAT Advanced Prep Weekend

Who: John Richardson

Where: University of Toronto – St. Michael’s College – Room TBA

When: May 13, 14 – 9:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Price: $495 + HST = $559.35

Registration: See below

Why: Lately I have been receiving a number of calls where people say something like …

I have already taken the LSAT. I have taken this LSAT course or that course. I have used this LSAT tutor or that LSAT tutor, I have used this LSAT book or that book. I am overwhelmed by all the steps and procedures. I need to take the LSAT again, etc, etc, etc.

It’s clear that these people do NOT need a “beginners” LSAT course. What they do need is to learn:

“How to get a larger number of right answers by applying a fewer number of skills.”

Furthermore, the reasons that people have trouble with the LSAT are more related to their reading than to their reasoning. The single most important skill tested on the LSAT is to accurately read and understand the INFORMATION you are expected to then REASON with.

That said, the focus of this weekend will be overwhelmingly on LSAT Logic Games and LSAT Logical Reasoning

But, I would like you to start right now. Here is a post that describes your objective in LSAT preparation and what you must achieve. Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication in both LSAT and in life.

During the weekend, you will learn how to:

– why the LSAT is more of reading test than a reasoning test. In fact, the LSAT really should be called the “READ Test

– identify a smaller number of LSAT skills/techniques that are ALWAYS relevant

– Simplicity is virtue. How to make the complex simple

– learn how to better understand what the LSAT question is telling you and HOW to work with that information (it is not possible to work with all the information that the LSAT throws your way)

– the Logic Games Toolbox (doing more with less)

– adjust the order in which you do the questions

– understand the differences between “diagramming” and “positioning” and how to get started answering questions more quickly

– conditional statements, parallel reasoning and how to better use “conditional statements” (a former president of Law Services call “conditional reasoning” the “basic LSAT reasoning task”) – but watch our for the most common of LSAT mistakes in conditional reasoning

(See my interview with Professor Deborah Bennet: Author of: “Logic Made Easy”)

– how to get your “best guess on record more quickly” (sometimes  you are better off getting a question wrong quickly than getting it right slowly). “Different strokes for different folks.” How your personality type will affect the way that you answer LSAT questions.

– while we are on the topic of personality, there is some evidence that LSAT Prep affects your brain

– why you should NOT categorize LSAT Logical Reasoning questions and what you should ask about all Logical Reasoning questions

– identifying and avoiding the most common LSAT Logical Reasoning flaws

– how to strip LSAT arguments down to their bare essentials (so, what’s an LSAT argument anyway?)

– and more (plus you will actually have a lot of fun) …

My goal is to help you do more with a fewer number of skills that ALWAYS matter.

Pre-Course Prep:

I once wrote a post on “Pre-LSAT Prep” …

But, before the weekend …

1. I urge all attendees to purchase and read “The New Official LSAT SuperPrep” from LSAT. There is a new edition available, but if you can’t get the new edition, the Old “Official LSAT SuperPrep” is fine.

2. I want you to read my list of “Best LSAT Blog Posts“. I have worked hard on them over the years.

Registration – Three ways:

1. Phone VISA or Mastercard: 416 410 7737

2. Eventbrite

3. Email us at: LSATPreparation at gmail dot com

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Toronto Mastering The LSAT Preparation Courses

John Richardson – Mastering The LSAT  – Toronto, Canada – 416 410 7737

Put 30 Years of LSAT Teaching Experience and Law School Admissions Consulting To Work For You!

The only complete LSAT and Law School Application Course!

New Law School Preview Program – Everything you need to know about law school and how to succeed!


Who: John Richardson – Author: Law School Bound and Mastering The LSAT (of the bar of Ontario)

Where: University of Toronto – St. Michael’s College

When: Multiple start dates – Courses starting on any of:  November 16, 23, 30

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Great lecture for anybody interested in any kind of career in law

This is the kind of video that should be seen before you go to law school, during law school and after law school!

It should be seen in addition to the videos in the previous F. Lee Bailey post.

Interested in criminal law? Great interview with F. Lee Bailey at the height of his career

F. Lee Baily has been one of America’s most well known and effective criminal lawyers. Some love him. Some hate him. But, it’s impossible to not respect his abilities as a lawyer.

Now: At 83 he is now living a “quieter life” in Maine. He reflects on some of his cases here:

Then: What follows is a fascinating interview of Mr. Bailey when he was a “rising legal star” – soon to become a legend.

The following videos will motivate some of you to want to become criminal lawyers. Your LSAT Preparation is the first step.

Still interested in becoming a criminal lawyer? You might find this blog piece about Toronto lawyer Peter Rosenthal to be of interest.

Evidence that @Official_LSAT is making changes to better compete with #GRE

For some I have been arguing that the days of the “LSAT Monopoly” are coming to an end. Over the last decade there has been discussion about whether the LSAT should be required at all AND/OR whether the GRE should be used as a substitute for the LSAT. I have discussed this in numerous posts which include:

– “American Bar Association Considers Whether The LSAT Should Be Required

– “The GRE As A Possible Substitute For The LSAT

– “The GRE Joins The LSAT As An Objective and Reliable Admissions Test

– “The Revolution Is Beginning: Forget the #LSAT. This Law School Will Accept Your #GRE Scores.”

In any case, it appears that the Law School Admission Council has accepted that it will have to compete with the GRE.

The evidence includes:

For those who don’t believe in free markets and competition, this is your answer.

How would you have done @LSATpreparation on the 1959 #LSAT?

There are two kinds of LSAT Historians.

Type 1 – Those who must repeat and repeat the LSAT (the greater number).

Type 2 – “LSAT Scholars” who are fascinated by the LSAT (far fewer).

Every generation thinks it has it harder than the previous generation. Maybe yes. Maybe no.

How would you have performed on the 1959 version of the LSAT? Try some LSAT questions and find out.

LSAT19591960

Introducing LSAT Logical Reasoning – The Terrain @LSATPreparation

Introducing LSAT Logical Reasoning – The Terrain

A study of arguments should be part of any LSAT preparation course.

Introduction – What Skills Does The LSAT Test?

The LSAT is a test of reading and reasoning in context. Your reading and reasoning skills will tested in the broad  contexts of:

LSAT Logical Reasoning

LSAT Logic Games

LSAT Reading Comprehension
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Planning your legal career: Advice from a former Supreme Court Justice

The above tweet references an article written by former Supreme Court of Canada Justice Ian Binnie. There are two aspects of the post that are of interest to those considering a legal career. The first aspect focuses on career advice for the individual. The second contains observations about the role (possibly diminishing) that lawyers will play in our society.

Career advice for the individual …

Finally, nobody will be a success if they don’t like their work, especially if it’s in a disagreeable environment. The law offers terrific opportunities for a fulfilling career if you follow your own instincts, chart your own path and keep your independence so you’re able to walk away from an intolerable situation. Above all, if you don’t enjoy what you’re doing, stop doing it.

Observations about the role of the legal profession …

If lawyers can’t or won’t supply the service, the legal system will find ways to deal with disputes without resorting to lawyers. PayPal and eBay rely on online-dispute resolution systems to resolve 90 percent of the 60 million user conflicts that occur each year. Online dispute resolution is also a reality in British Columbia for small claims court. Keep this in mind as you plan your career.

Those taking the June LSAT may be interested in our Toronto LSAT Preparation courses.

The #GRE joins the #LSAT as an objective and reliable admissions test

The above tweet references an article at TaxProf blog reporting that Harvard Law School (you would be surprised how many famous people are Harvard Law School Graduates) is the latest and possibly most important law school to allow applicants to submit the GRE rather than the LSAT.

The article includes:
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The revolution is beginning: Forget The #LSAT. This Law School Will Accept Your #GRE Scores

The revolution is beginning. The use of the GRE as a substitute for the LSAT is a development that I have been predicting for years.

Listen and enjoy …

The Blueprint For How #LawSchools Will Pull Out Of ‘Death Spiral’

The above tweet references the above article in Forbes.

Of interest to pre-law students is:

LSAT scores are a good predictor of whether a student will pass the bar exam, and a recent analysis by the advocacy group Law School Transparency shows a steady decline in scores.

Last year, LSAT scores at 37 law schools were so low that half of incoming students were considered to be at high risk of failing the bar. In 2010, the same could be said for only nine schools.