Monthly Archives: March 2011

Canadian law school rankings and your choice of law school

I have just finished my personal “March Madness” in which I have presented law school admission and free LSAT preparation and law school admission seminars on Ontario university campuses.  I always students to take the LSAT in June or in October at the latest. These are the best LSAT test dates to take advantage of  our Toronto LSAT preparation courses. I am amazed at how much pre-law students   think about the rankings of various law schools.  This (IMHO) is a great mistake.

Rankings are  the last thing you should consider when choosing Canadian law schools. Since, this is an opinion and not a statement of fact, let me explain.

 

Canadian law school rankings – the new kid on the block

Canadian law school rankings are a relatively new phenomenon. For many years:

–        The  Canadian Lawyer law school rankings were the only game in town – they have been replaced with a survey of Canadian law schools;

–        MacLeans started its annual law school rankings a  few years ago

Both rankings attempt to differentiate the 16 common law schools from the civil law schools in Quebec.

Assuming the validity of the rankings (and there is no reason to do so), why would the ranking of a law school, matter potentially to a pre-law student?

Let me suggest two possible answers: Continue reading

LSAT Logic Games – 8 Essential Skills

Welcome To LSAT Logic Games Dot Calm

The LSAT is a test of reading and reasoning in three different contexts. One of the contexts is called “Analytical Reasoning” or “Logic Games” (LSAT Logical Reasoning and LSAT Reading Comprehension are the other two contexts).

Many LSAT test  takers  experience a high degree of anxiety with the LSAT Logic Games. The good news is that  Logic Games is quite susceptible  to short term improvement.

Reading and Reasoning – The Two Fundamental  Aspects

Reading – Understanding the conditions in Logic Games

Reasoning – Making inferences  with the reasoning that you understand

More people have trouble with the reading and understanding of the conditions than with making inferences  from the conditions.

LSAT  Reality – Time Is A Wasting – You Need to Get Started

Any LSAT teacher or book can explain the answers to Logic Games questions after the fact. Although this has some value,  it is irrelevant. The real  problem is that people either don’t know how to get started or take  so long getting started that they run out of time. You must learn to proceed without the confidence even when you are uncomfortable.

Logic Games – The LSAT Perspective

In April of 2010, Lori Davis, a senior test designer at LSAT, offered a webinar on LSAT Analytical Reasoning. It was very interesting – I wrote a summary of of it.  Read about the Logic Games Webinar here.

Some Basic LSAT Logic Games Skills

Skill 1 – How To Accurately Understand The Conditions Continue reading

LSAT Logical Reasoning – How The Argument Goes

Introducing LSAT Logical Reasoning – The Terrain

Introduction – What Skills Does The LSAT Test?

The LSAT is a test of reading and reasoning in context. Your reading and reasoning skills will tested in the broad contexts of the following three question types:

– LSAT Logical Reasoning

LSAT Logic Games

– LSAT Reading Comprehension

The Format Of Logical Reasoning

Logical Reasoning consists of two of the four scored sections on the LSAT. Each section will have approximately twenty-five questions. For this reason many people  say that “Logical Reasoning”  is fifty percent of the LSAT. No, reading and reasoning is one hundred percent of  the LSAT. Continue reading

Should you retake the LSAT?

Definition: the words “LSAT Happiness” mean that an LSAT test taker has:

“achieved a score that is high enough that he or she will not be rejected from law school.”

The February LSAT scores are out. There are four groups of score recipients: Continue reading